the HANDBOOK BY JON HICKS • FOREWORD BY THE NOUN PROJECT ii The Icon Handbook by Jon Hicks Published in by Five. Downloads. The Icon Handbook Goodies pack contains: iOS Application Icon Template for Adobe Illustrator CS5. Includes masks for previewing iOS icons with . The Icon Handbook is a reference manual, how-to guide and coffee table ' showcase' in one. learn how to design icons for interfaces.

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    Icon Handbook Pdf

    tirucamilo.tkok - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online. tirucamilo.tkok. Have you ever needed to create an icon for something and not known where to start? How do you go about crafting the right message, the tone. As an introduction to programming in Icon, the handbook assumes you already know how to program in some other procedural programming language—C or.

    Owner is out Hit the road - quick! Otto and Marie Neurath Isotype Collection University of Reading 11 Gerd Arntz can be credited with being the originator of the pictogram style we still use today. In particular, the influence of Neuraths Isotype work can be seen two decades later, in the pictograms designed to represent individual sports for each of the Olympic Games from 1964 to 1972. The team created a clean geometric identity for the Games, which itself is a design classic, and the pictograms typify the cool, precise and logical approach they took. No line is wasted in these symbols: everything is pared down to its absolute minimum. Symbols from the 1972 left , 1968 right and 1964 far right Olympic Games 12 Symbols from the 1964 Olympic Games 13 However, when we think of icons, we probably most commonly think of their use on computers. While much of its interface was still text-based, it had a mouse and therefore a pointer and a painting package containing the familiar icon-based tools window that we still use today. It was a research tool intended for organisations like universities, and wasnt available to purchase by the public. It was no less influential despite this, inspiring the Xerox Star Workstation that followed it in 1981, and the first personal computer with a graphical user interface the Apple Lisa in 1983. It was after the creation of the Alto that the term icon was coined in a PhD thesis by David Canfield Smith, a computer science graduate student at Stanford University in California.

    Otto and Marie Neurath Isotype Collection University of Reading 11 Gerd Arntz can be credited with being the originator of the pictogram style we still use today. The team created a clean geometric identity for the Games, which itself is a design classic, and the pictograms typify the cool, precise and logical approach they took.

    No line is wasted in these symbols: everything is pared down to its absolute minimum. Symbols from the 1972 left , 1968 right and 1964 far right Olympic Games 12 Symbols from the 1964 Olympic Games 13 However, when we think of icons, we probably most commonly think of their use on computers. While much of its interface was still text-based, it had a mouse and therefore a pointer and a painting package containing the familiar icon-based tools window that we still use today.

    It was no less influential despite this, inspiring the Xerox Star Workstation that followed it in 1981, and the first personal computer with a graphical user interface — the Apple Lisa in 1983. It was after the creation of the Alto that the term icon was coined in a PhD thesis by David Canfield Smith, a computer science graduate student at Stanford University in California.

    It was the first computer to have a GUI and it also started the now familiar office metaphor of desktop, files, folders and wastebaskets that we still use today. His style used rounded rectangles with distinctive heavy strokes to give contrast.

    If you want Star to file something, roll the mouse and move the cursor to a picture of an appropriately labeled file folder; for storing deleted material, point to the picture of a wastebasket.

    Back in 1984 our family got an Acorn Electron, a home computer based on the BBC Micro, with the added benefit of being a bit cheaper! Laughable now, but connecting it to the TV was magical: one of those moments when you feel like the future has finally arrived. This provided the opportunity to replace the sprites with my own designs, so that a simple driving game could become an X-Wing doing a trench run, for example. This was then converted into a VDU code by adding up the values of the columns in each row, as seen at the top of the next page.

    When I left school to study illustration and design at art college towards the end of the 1980s, I had my first experience of using a computer with a GUI: in this case, the Mac. The college was kitted out with now legendary Mac Classics, and I became aware of the groundbreaking icon work Susan Kare had done for Mac System Software 1. Everything I know and love about icons is embodied in that work from 1984, and it took until 2001 before the Mac OS icons progressed to any significant degree.

    Her famous animated wristwatch icon to let the user know a task is in progress is still used today in Adobe Photoshop. I was lucky enough to get the chance to interview Susan for this book.

    First of all, many thanks for agreeing to be a part of The Icon Handbook! I particularly wanted to feature the original Mac icons as they encapsulate everything that icons should be and are, of course, design classics. How did the project with Apple come about? He needed some bitmaps so encouraged me to develop some early images on graph paper. Was the lack of previous work in that area a help or a hindrance?

    Yes, a new medium but in another sense there is nothing new under the sun. I joke that if you can do needlepoint, you can design bitmap graphics. What tools did you use to design the original Mac icons other than sketching?

    Did you have a graphical editor to work with? It also automatically generated the hex equivalent. Not too many tools initially, but it worked really well. You also designed the Apple Command icon that is now an accepted convention. How did you come up with a symbol for such an abstract concept?

    Laughable now, but connecting it to the TV was magical: one of those moments when you feel like the future has finally arrived. My first experience of coding was with BBC Basic, creating 88 pixel sprites for simple games like Bugzap. This provided the opportunity to replace the sprites with my own designs, so that a simple driving game could become an X-Wing doing a trench run, for example.

    The first stage was to draw the artwork in the 88 grid supplied in the back of the Electron manual in pencil, of course this would get erased and reused many times.

    This was then converted into a VDU code by adding up the values of the columns in each row, as seen at the top of the next page. When I left school to study illustration and design at art college towards the end of the 1980s, I had my first experience of using a computer with a GUI: in this case, the Mac.

    Handbook 2018-19 effective 9-1-2018.pdf

    The college was kitted out with now legendary Mac Classics, and I became aware of the groundbreaking icon work Susan Kare had done for Mac System Software 1. Hailed by the Museum of Modern Art in New York as a pioneering and influential computer iconographer she developed the original icons for Macintosh System Software 1.

    Everything I know and love about icons is embodied in that work from 1984, and it took until 2001 before the Mac OS icons progressed to any significant degree.

    Her famous animated wristwatch icon to let the user know a task is in progress is still used today in Adobe Photoshop. I was lucky enough to get the chance to interview Susan for this book.

    The Icon Handbook by Jon Hicks — Stuff & Nonsense

    First of all, many thanks for agreeing to be a part of The Icon Handbook! I particularly wanted to feature the original Mac icons as they encapsulate everything that icons should be and are, of course, design classics. Youre known for the original Mac icons but Ive heard that your background up to that point was in sculpture.

    How did the project with Apple come about? I had the opportunity to join the Macintosh project thanks to my high school friend, Andy Hertzfeld, who was a software lead. He needed some bitmaps so encouraged me to develop some early images on graph paper. Was the lack of previous work in that area a help or a hindrance? I had a fair amount of experience in traditional graphic design so was able to build on that, plus common sense.

    Yes, a new medium but in another sense there is nothing new under the sun. I joke that if you can do needlepoint, you can design bitmap graphics. What tools did you use to design the original Mac icons other than sketching?

    Did you have a graphical editor to work with? It also automatically generated the hex equivalent. Not too many tools initially, but it worked really well. You also designed the Apple Command icon that is now an accepted convention.

    How did you come up with a symbol for such an abstract concept? I leafed through a book of symbols, and came across a similar cloverleaf, which was identified as an image used on signs in Swedish campgrounds to mean interesting feature.

    This seemed appropriate, and would lend itself to being recreated in a limited number of pixels, plus fit well on a squarish key cap.

    Academic Handbook

    Years later, I learned that it is meant to be a castle, seen from above. Finally, what do you find are the differences if any designing icons now compared to the original Mac icons? Obviously, more pixels and more colours affords a greater range of stylistic options but, conceptually, the design problem is similar what image can you create in a limited piece of screen real estate to communicate a particular idea at a glance?

    It was a terrific opportunity to work on the original Macintosh with so many talented colleagues. I was no longer limited to an 88 pixel size with limited colour palette: 32 pixels allowed so much more space for artwork, and with a wider range of colours.

    My interest up to this point was still restricted to merely fiddling around for a bit of fun, but when I went freelance in 2002 and bought my first Mac with OS X 10. Icons could now be as large as 128 pixels, allowing for a much greater level of detail, as part of a much richer UI. Whats more, esoteric tools like ResEdit were no longer needed, as icons could be created in the graphic editors that I used every day, like Illustrator and Photoshop.

    The amount of detail possible also meant the process had become more timeconsuming, creating multiple resolutions of the same image for different contexts such as file views and the Dock.

    It was no less enjoyable for that, though. As I had originally trained in illustration, but had so far followed a graphic design career path, icon design was a welcome return to my earlier skills.

    I started by creating replacements for the Camino browsers UI in 2003 and, in particular, its application icon, which I based on the famous Japanese painting The Great Wave by Hokusai. Looking back now, those early icons were fairly low quality, but I was hooked and all I wanted to do was stop all these print and web design projects and instead draw icons all day. It was the Great Wave icon for Camino that got the attention of Steven Garrity, who was charged with finding volunteers for a new Mozilla visual identity team to create a new identity for their new browser.

    Originally called Phoenix and then Firebird, it was eventually given the permanent name of Firefox for its first public release in 2004. We all came up with various ideas, but the fox with a fiery tail we decided on came from Daniel Burka, which was then sketched by Stephen Desroches, before I took it on and rendered it.

    The new icon was launched in early 2004, and since then Firefox has become a global brand and the icon has been updated further by the Iconfactory.

    It was a big leap in profile for me, and has allowed me to follow icon design projects ever since, for clients such as Skype, Opera and Linotype. Icons as childs play When our local primary school decided to run a creative arts month in 2007, parents whose profession was in the arts were invited to come in and run a workshop, demonstrating their skill and giving the children a chance to have a go.

    I decided that I could do one for icon design, although I would have to explain what icons were and why we need them. The children were fascinated to come to terms with the fact that icons are such an integral part of all their lives, even though they didnt realise it or know what they were called beforehand.

    I started by handing out sheets with a 1616 grid and asked them to plan what they would do for their first icon. While they could design anything they liked, most followed the suggestion of trying to sum themselves up in a icon, by showing their interests, for instance. We then used a free, open source application called LiquidIcon to create a simple.

    It was an ideal application to use, with a very simple grid interface that echoed the handout sheets theyd been working on. The results were interesting. Most werent interested at the start but, once they got going, everyone was engaged.

    The thing I noticed most was that there was a significant portion who understood how small the final icon would be, and how simple it needed to be. The principles well explore in this book are the same keep icons simple, clean and recognisable. They serve a wide range of purposes, from overcoming language barriers and describing functions, to conveying mood and emotion.

    This chapter looks at the various uses of icons, but also covers an equally important aspect when not to use them. Even though the focus of this book is on icons for websites, and desktop and mobile applications, it is useful to consider the wider context: books, road signs, airports and railway stations, and anywhere else you see icons!

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